Roundup® Lawsuits: History and Developments

A look at the legal basis for lawsuits over Roundup®, and a summary of high-profile court decisions.

Popular weed killers like Roundup® rely on the herbicide glyphosate as their active ingredient, but a link between glyphosate and serious health problems (including a form of cancer known as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) has prompted the filing of thousands of lawsuits (many by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners). Let’s look at the legal arguments behind these cases, and recent headlines involving Roundup® lawsuits and the massive $10.9 billion settlement that could affect future cases.

Roundup® Litigation Basics

Injuries and health problems caused by exposure to dangerous substances—including prescription drugs, pesticides, and other chemicals―are often classified as "toxic torts" or "mass torts."

Sometimes chemicals that are thought to be fairly safe turn out to pose serious health risks. When it comes to weed-killing sprays, companies like Bayer (which acquired Roundup® maker Monsanto in 2018) argue that there is no scientific connection between glyphosate and cancer, and they point to the fact that even the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization can't agree on whether glyphosate is a carcinogen (in 2017, the EPA stated that the chemical wasn't likely cancer-causing, despite the fact that two years earlier, the WHO had classified glyphosate as "probably carcinogenic"). Learn more about why Roundup® hasn't been recalled.

Despite the absence of a definitive scientific connection between Roundup® and cancer, the link has been strong enough to support some high-profile verdicts in a number of glyphosate lawsuits against Bayer/Monsanto.

Roundup® Lawsuit Verdicts and More

Here's a look at some recent court action involving Roundup®.

September 2020: Bayer Settles 15,000 Roundup® Lawsuits

Bayer/Monsanto and a number of plaintiffs' attorneys have agreed to settle 15,000 lawsuits over health problems linked to use of Roundup®.

Terms of the settlements (including dollar figures) weren't announced, but according to multiple news outlets, all 15,000 cases were being handled by the only three lawyers to have taken Roundup® lawsuits to trial against Bayer/Monsanto. So it looks like the lawyers with the most courtroom experience going up against Bayer/Monsanto are now out of the litigation picture, which is likely no coincidence.

These agreements are part of the big $10.9 billion settlement in the Roundup® multi-district litigation (MDL) discussed below, and it's not yet clear how the judge handling the MDL will fold these latest deals into the bigger settlement picture.

August 2020: Massive Proposed Roundup® Settlement Hits More Snags

An $10.9 billion settlement agreement meant to resolve most existing and future lawsuits over Roundup®-related illness continues to encounter roadblocks. The latest developments (according to Bloomberg and other news outlets) have plaintiffs' lawyers accusing Bayer of reneging on the deal, and the judge expressing concerns that the German multinational corporation is manipulating the settlement process.

U.S. District Court Judge Vince Chhabria, who is handling the Roundup® multi-district litigation (MDL), is considering lifting a pause on proceedings—in place since Bayer and plaintiffs' lawyers began trying to iron out terms of the settlement—and allowing trials to go forward.

Back in June, Bayer agreed to settle the vast majority of Roundup® lawsuits for almost $11 billion. The agreement includes 95 percent of cases already set for trial. Between $8.8 billion and $9.6 billion of the settlement goes to cover those current cases, with about $1.25 billion set aside to cover future plaintiffs that have yet to bring suit against Bayer.

In July 2020, Judge Chhabria first expressed concerns over how the proposed settlement agreement might apply to future cases, including use of a "Class Science Panel" to decide issues that are typically resolved via the court process. Learn more about how the Bayer Roundup® settlement works.

July 2020: Verdict for Groundskeeper Upheld; Award Reduced to $20.5M

A California appellate court denied Bayer's request to overturn the trial court's decision in the first Roundup® injury lawsuit to reach a verdict: In 2018, a California jury found in favor of a 46-year-old groundskeeper who worked at a number of California schools.

In that 2018 trial, the plaintiff's attorneys argued that the groundskeeper developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after using Roundup® on the job, and that there is a scientific connection between the product and the illness. The jury agreed, finding that Bayer/Monsanto failed to issue adequate warnings to consumers when it comes to Roundup® and cancer risks. Bayer/Monsanto was ordered to pay $39 million in compensatory damages, plus another $250 million in punitive damages.

The total award was later reduced to $78.5 million. Then in July 2020, though denying Bayer's request to overturn the verdict, the California appellate court further reduced the groundskeeper's award from $78.5 million to $20.5 million.

Learn about different kinds of damages in a personal injury case, and why punitive damages are rare.

June 2020: Judge Blocks Roundup® Warning Label in California

In a win for Roundup® manufacturer Bayer, a federal court judge in California has prevented California officials from requiring that the popular weed killing product contain a prominent safety warning on store shelves in the state. Cautionary product labels like these are known as "Prop 65" warnings, named after a 1986 state ballot initiative requiring California businesses to provide warnings to consumers about products that could bring significant exposure to chemicals that cause cancer and birth defects.

In his June 22 ruling against the state's proposed action, U.S. District Judge William B. Shubb declared that "requiring Bayer to provide the warning on Roundup is a violation of its free-speech protections," according to Bloomberg.

The state's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment has listed glyphosate as cancer-causing since 2017, but the federal judge's ruling on Roundup®'s labeling seems to be at odds with that agency's determination.

July 2019: Judge Cuts Punitive Damages Award in Roundup® Case

After a federal jury in California awarded a plaintiff around $75 million in punitive damages as part of a successful Roundup® lawsuit, the judge cut that figure to around $20 million. Though evidence showed that the plaintiff had used Roundup® for over 25 years (in his yard) before developing cancer, the judge found the punitive damages award "constitutionally impermissible" relative to the amount of compensatory damages awarded (around $5 million, an amount the judge left unchanged from the jury's March 2019 decision).

May 2019: Over $2B for Roundup® Plaintiff (Later Reduced)

A third California jury ordered Bayer to pay $2 billion in punitive damages in a lawsuit filed by a couple who both developed cancer after using Roundup® for over 30 years. The couple was also awarded another $55 million as compensation for their medical bills, pain and suffering, and other damages. A few months later, this massive award was reduced to $86.7 after the judge concluded that the $2B judgment was significantly out of step with legal precedent.

What's Next?

Roundup® remains on store shelves across the country, and the product continues to be touted in print and TV ads. Bayer is still appealing some of the verdicts we’ve covered here—and working to finalize the stalled $10.9 billion settlement—but lawsuits against the company (and even against certain retailers of Roundup®) continue to be filed, so check back for updates.

If you're thinking about taking legal action over health problems potentially caused by your use of a glyphosate product, get tips on finding the right lawyer for you and your case.

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